Relationships > Problems

relationships bigger than problems

I look back on my life… and I’ve had some really great relationships with certain people. Had some really bad ones too. I’m not alone. We all can relate.

But sometimes, life happens, and problems arise. Some problems strengthen relationships. Some problems sever them.

This last week I read a book called Rare Leadership, and though there are a number of other things I could comment on about the insights on the book, I felt today that I should simply shed a little light and encouragement on this one little nugget.

Sometimes in life we put too much priority on the “problem” instead of the “person”. Sometimes the issue you may be facing may become the issue that fractures the relationship. Sometimes too much stake in placed on the situation than the association… and some really great bonds can ultimately break.

Take Acts 15 for instance. Paul is having a great time with his buddy Barnabas and then within only three verses they are heading in two totally separate directions angry with one another.

Problem is… sometimes we can do it in less than three verses. That’s how quickly something great can turn into something horrible; simply from making the “problem” more important than the “relationship”.

I believe we need to aim to always make the relationship greater than the problem. Don’t allow the “problem” you face define the “person” you are dealing with.

In the end, it will not be the problems you solved that will define you, but the circle of people who you have influenced, loved, served, and grown with. Your cheering section will not be filled with your accolades… it will be filled with your associations.

At least that’s how I see it,

 

C

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The Valley Of Praise

Valley of Praise.png

I can’t believe I’m writing this. I have too much to do. Two days away at a conference. Twenty-four hours of worship about to start tomorrow. Get ready for my message on Sunday (without googling one). Oh ya… be a pastor as well. Now this blog too?

But what I happened to read in my devotions today compelled me to write this in light of what we are about to launch into tomorrow with our Day and Night of Worship event.

It’s a message I should really be taking time to unpack and share as a sermon, but I can’t hold it back. The text is 2Chronicles 20. The king of Judah (Jehoshaphat) is about to have a ‘vast army’ come to engage with him. Alarmed, he goes to God. Actually, verse four says the whole nation of Judah sought God.

One of the Levites (tribe of priests) says is verse 15 that “the battle is not yours, but God’s” (that in itself is another message). That’s not the good part that jumped out at me. Read this…

“After consulting the people, Jehoshaphat appointed men to sing to the Lord and to praise him for the splendour of his holiness as they went out at the head of the army, saying: ‘Give thanks to the Lord for his love endures forever.’

“As they began to sing and praise, the Lord set ambushes against the men of Ammon and Moab and Mount Seir who were invading Judah, and they were defeated.” (vv. 21-22 NIV)

Here’s the thing: “Praise precedes promotion.” The victory came because they recognized that regardless of what things ‘looked’ like, it was God’s battle to win, thus their reason to praise Him.

Even more, the place where all the dead laid lying after the victory was called the “Valley of Beracah – the ‘Valley of Praise’.”

Oh man, I’m excited!!!! It does not matter what may be facing you in that valley right now… the movement against you may seem like a ‘vast army’… but it’s not YOUR battle… it’s HIS! And your role? You are called to praise… praise Him for His splendour, His holiness, His love that endures forever!

Tomorrow we are no different than King Jehoshaphat. We recognize that in order to move forward in victory, we will praise the One who has defeated the enemy, and will continue to do so.

In the valley we face, we will witness His praise!!!!

At least that’s how I see it,

 

 

C

Stop Living On The Coast

Coasting is living on borrowed power. It’s deciding to allow the momentum of the past to get you through where you are right now and in the not-too-distant future.

But coasting cannot sustain itself. Friction, resistance, and gravity (all analogies of daily life) will consume quickly all that you’ve worked towards and slow you down… to the point where regaining momentum will actually be harder than simply keep going.

So keep going. Keep pedalling. Make today count. Don’t rely on yesterday to make your today.